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Glasgow Scotland and Campsie Fells

Sunday, May 10, 2009

This morning, I visited Queen's Park in the south side of Glasgow which provides commanding views over the surrounding area.

The area is rich in history with evidence going back to the Iron Age. However, key claim to fame is the 1568 Battle of Langside where Mary Queen of Scots suffered a defeat.

The current park was laid out 1857-1862 to a design by Sir Joseph Paxton (of Crystal Palace, London fame).

Key reason for visit this morning was to use the vantage point to photograph Glasgow. Below is a video clip showing the centre of Glasgow with the Campsie Fells (hills) in the distance.



video

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Wildfowl at Queens Park Glasgow Scotland

Thursday, February 05, 2009

Today, many parts of Britain were suffering extreme transport difficulties due to heavy snow falls and ice. Over 5000 schools were closed. However, Glasgow was a pocket of relative normality but light conditions remained poor.

This morning, I continued my wildfowl theme with a visit to Queen's Park to photograph the birds. This area was, in fact, a major battle site (Battle of Langside 1568) but is now put to more peaceful uses.

As the video clip shows, the park is covered by snow and the pond frozen over.

The pond is carefully managed to help the wildlife. There is a resident pair of Mute Swans which breed.


video

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Queen's Park Archaeology Glasgow Scotland

Saturday, January 31, 2009

This morning, I visited a curious historical site at Camphill, Glasgow which is marked as a "fort" on official plans.

The earthwork consists of a badly eroded earthen rampart measuring internally 95m north-south by 93m slightly to one side of the summit of the hill.

Elevation of the site affords superb views and lends the site to defensive or observational purposes. However, various official excavations have proved inconclusive. Balance of probability is that the site is medieval as opposed to Iron Age. In 1985 a tiny shred of Roman samian ware pottery was found in the eroding bank which may put the date back nearly two millennia. The large rocks found in the centre of the site appear to have been placed there in relatively recent times.

The site appears to have no connection with the 1568 Battle of Langside which took place close by.

video video

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