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Mackintosh's House for Art Lover, Glasgow,

Thursday, March 04, 2010

This afternoon, I went off to Charles Rennie Mackintosh's House for Art Lover at Bellahouston Park with principal objective of obtaining images of emerging seasonal plants and flowers in the well kept garden which adjoins the House For Art Lover. Unfortunately, the recent very severe winter seems to have taken its toll. However, by way of consolation, I was pleased to see a good display of snowdrops emerging from the ravages of the frost and ice.


This building, although designed at turn of the 20th century, was not completed until 1996, the design having languished for some 90 years. Rooms include the Main Room, Oval Room, Music Room and Margaret MacDonald Room. The Glasgow School of Art (principal building also designed by Mackintosh) has space and facilities at House for Art Lover. The public can tour the building for a modest fee; a worthwhile experience. Here is a video clip from last year.

In the grounds of the House I found this sculpture of a foot.

Here are the snowdrops


Elsewhere today, I have been working on various tour enquiries for upcoming season. Next task is to post another tranche of WW1 casualties as recorded at the Barrhead War Memorial to my GlasgowAncestry blog. The loss of life from this town was horrendous.

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Glasgow School of Art, Scotland

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

This morning, I visited the Glasgow of School of Art ("GSA"). In architectural terms, this is an iconic building and considered to be one of the most influential and significant structures of the 20th century.

The GSA was founded in 1845. In 1896 the present Mackintosh Building was designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh who worked for the Glasgow architect firm of Honeyman and Keppie. Half of the building was completed in 1899 with the western end finished a decade later in 1909. This staggered completion was due to financial constraints at the time. Mackintosh was 41 years of age at completion.

This building, which still houses the working Art School, has been described as "The only art school in the world where the building is worthy of the subject".

Mackintosh was a graduate of the GSA. Not surprisingly, the School houses extensive Mackintosh and other collections which, together with other archive material, document the history of the GSA and art, design and architecture education since the School was founded in 1845.

The north facade of the building reflects the internal plan and results in a masterpiece of balanced asymmetry. The entrance is at the centre of the building. See this video for a better appreciation.



Entrace to Glasgow School of Art

Side elevation


Side aspect



Mackintosh left an extensive legacy around Glasgow. Contact me for more information regarding tours.

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Mackintosh, Glasgow Architecture, Scotland

Sunday, September 13, 2009

This afternoon, I am posting information on Charles Rennie Mackintosh, a Glasgow born architect who left a considerable legacy of work in the city of his birth.

Very briefly, Mackintosh (1868-1928) was a designer, architect and artist whose work covered a very broad compass, from jewellery to graphics, from wall decoration to exhibited paintings, from pottery vases to wood engraving. Often working in conjunction with his wife, Margaret McDonald, Mackintosh designed a wide array of objects for domestic use including tables, chairs, cutlery and napkins, carpets, mirrors, curtain fabric and light fittings, beds, hat stands, wardrobes and clocks. He also designed buildings in their entirety, including foundations, structural steel, ventilation systems and plumbing. He also painted landscapes and flowers.

However, Mackintosh is perhaps best known for his underlying theme of designing places to be inhabited taking account of the rooms, sequences of rooms, their form, light and material. Perhaps the best known example of his domestic design work is the famous 'House for an Art Lover' which is located in the same vicinity as the Burrell Collection, one of Glasgow's top visitor attractions. Other famous examples of Mackintosh's work include the Hill House (Helensburgh), Mackintosh Church, Willow Tea Rooms and Scotland Street School Museum.

It should be remembered that Mackintosh did not work in isolation. He was one member of the 'Glasgow Four' comprising Mackintosh, Herbert MacNair and the sisters Margaret and Frances McDonald. This group worked within the Glasgow School of Art (itself designed by Mackintosh) around 1890-1910 and produced decorative works of furniture, architecture, panels, embroideries and graphic material.

Via my tour guiding company, catswhiskerstours.co.uk I provide private tours of the Mackintosh sites.

Today I am focusing on just one aspect of Mackintosh's work, namely the Daily Record Building in Renfield Lane, Glasgow G2. This is tucked away and is best accessed on foot. In designing this building Mackintosh made striking use of colour on the facade and skilfully combined sculptured sandstone with white glazed bricks to maximise light.



video

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Mackintosh-The Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow, Scotland.

Friday, July 17, 2009

Today, we continued the Charles Rennie Mackintosh theme by visiting the Willow Tea Rooms, located at 217 Sauchiehall St. in Glasgow, "Sauchiehall" means 'alley of the willows' and throughout the rooms Mackintosh used the willow motif.
Catherine Cranston more or less invented the Glasgow tea room phenomenon. She filled the need for a miniature social centre which served many purposes but principally as a safe meeting place.The Tea Rooms uniquely offered ladies rooms where respectable women could go out and meet, at a time when women without men in the urban scene were usually taken for servants or prostitutes. These were not cafes, but offered a range of privacies in the public world: rooms for lunch or private dining, rooms to read and write, to play billiards or smoke. They were almost clubs, without bedrooms and without alcohol.

For 21 years Mackintosh was Catherine Cranston's designer from 1897.

At Buchanan Street, he designed murals around George Walton furniture.

At Argyle Street, it was his loose furniture and light fittings within Walton's interior scheme.

At Imgram Street, he designed his first complete room, where from 1900, he remodeled interiors over 12 years.

Finally in 1903-1904 at Sauchiehall Street, he did the complete interiors and front facade of the building Miss Cranston bought in 1901. To Mackintosh the tea room offered the most completed public space of his career.

These Tea Rooms are well a worth a visit when in Glasgow, just a short walk from the City centre.

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House for an Art Lover, Glasgow, Scotland

Thursday, July 16, 2009


This morning we visited C.R.Mackintosh's celebrated House for an Art Lover at 10 Dumbreck Road.

Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868-1928) was a designer and artist whose wide-ranging skills encompassed the the design of complete buildings-their foundations and structural steel, their sophisticated ventilation systems and their plumbing. His key strength was the design of places to be inhabited, rooms and sequences of rooms, their form, light and material.


In 1901 Mackintosh entered a competition set by a German design magazine which sought entries to design a 'grand house in a thoroughly modern style.', and challenged architects to develop ideas which were fresh and innovative.



Mackintosh and wife Margaret McDonald worked on the submission which, unfortunately, was disqualified for non-compliance with the competition rules. However, the designs were awarded a special prize " for their pronounced personal quality, their novel and austere form and the uniform configuration of interior and exterior."


The house was never completed in Mackintosh's lifetime. Work commenced 1989 and finished 1996.


View the video for an appreciation of the house interior, exterior and nearby walled garden. Here is the link


For the artistically inclined visitor to Glasgow this is a "must". Entrance charge is modest, photographs are permitted and their is an excellent cafe and gift shop. Beware: first check opening hours as the House is used for corporate events and weddings. Visit in conjunction with the equally famous Burrell Collection which is located close by.







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House for an Art Lover, Glasgow, Scotland.

Monday, June 22, 2009

Today, we visited the garden of House for an Art Lover. House for an Art Lover is located in 10 Dumbreck Rd, Glasgow.




In 1901, Mackintosh entered a competition set by a German design magazine which sought entries to design "a grand house in thoroughly modern style", and challenged architects to develop ideas which were fresh and innovative.

Mackintosh and his wife Margaret McDonald worked on the submission which, unfortunately, was disqualified due to technical non compliance with the rules. However, the designs were awarded a special prize "for their pronounced personal quality, their novel and austere form and uniforms configuration of interior and exterior."


Construction of the House did not commence until 1989 and was completed in 1996.






For the video clip, click here.



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