For exclusive Scottish tours, email info@catswhiskerstours.co.uk or visit my website.


Tour Dundonald Castle, Scotland

Tuesday, February 02, 2010


This morning I ventured out to Ayrshire to undertake research for an upcoming new web page. On setting out I had to navigate through a snow storm but after midday the weather was transformed into blue sky and sunshine.

On the way home I paid a visit to a very impressive castle which is situated close to the Ayrshire coast, south of Glasgow, namely Dundonald.

The site benefits from a high elevation and such dominates the local landscape and provides views out to Ben Lomond ( 40 miles away) and the Firth (estuary) of Clyde and Isle of Arran.

Archaeological evidence indicates the site was occupied prior to 2000BC while a Dark Age fortress on the site was destroyed by fire before 1000AD.

The current fortification dates from the 1370s following rebuild of an early castle dating from around 1260.

Dundonald Castle was associated with the (Royal) Stewart family from inception until it was sold to the Cathcart family in 1482 and then subsequently the Wallaces and Cochranes. Chief architectural feature of the castle is the medieval, barrel-vaulted ceiling.

An appreciation of the castle and its environs can be found by viewing this video clip.


Below is an image of the first snowdrops I have spotted this year, found in Alloway.

Labels:

posted by Catswhiskers @ 8:49 AM  0 comments

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Dundonald Castle, Scotland

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

This afternoon I am posting information on Dundonald Castle which is located south oif Glasgow on the way to Troon and Ayr. A visit to Dundonald usually fits in nicely with a visit to Burns country and Alloway.

Dundonald Castle is an impressive ruin located on a high elevation with views across the Clyde estuary to the Isle of Arran. It must have been a formidable edifice in its day!

The castle is located on an ancient fortified site dating back to the Stone Age, many thousands of years ago. The current building superseded an earlier, 13th century castle built for the High Steward of Scotland to defend against Viking attacks.

The latest castle is based on a fortified Tower House (c.f. yesterday's post covering Castle Campbell) which was built for King Robert II on his accession to the Scottish Crown in 1371 and was used as a Royal residence by the early Stewart kings for the the next 150 years

This attraction is well presented with a useful Visitor Centre close by. However, access is via steep walkway.

This castle is definitely worth a visit.

I will post some images shortly.

Labels:

posted by Catswhiskers @ 8:32 AM  0 comments

0 Comments:

Post a Comment