For exclusive Scottish tours, email info@catswhiskerstours.co.uk or visit my website.


Barnard Castle, County Durham, England.

Friday, July 31, 2009

Today, I am posting information about Barnard Castle, County Durham, England. The town developed in the protective shadow of Bernard Baliol's castle. It sits on the north side of the River Tees.
The castle is one of the largest castles in England and taking its name from the founder: Bernard de Baliol.
Today,The English heritage assume the responsibility for the castle. Barnard castle is an attractive and nice town.
video

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Eggleston Abbey, County Durham, England.

Thursday, July 30, 2009

Today, I am posting information about Eggleston Abbey, County Durham England. Eggleston Abbey is a premonstratensian abbey in England. The Abbey was founded in 12th century by the Premonstratensians, who wore a white habit and became known as "the White Canons". It was the principal remains of the Premonstratensian monastic house.


The Abbey was dissolved in 1540 by King Henry VIII, the lands were granted to Robert Strelly in the 16th century. The Abbey was abandoned in the mid-19th century. Today, the site is maintained by English Heritage.

video

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Raby Castle, County Durham, England.

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

Today, I am posting information about Raby Castle, County Durham, England. Raby Castle is one of the largest and most impressive of English medieval castles.
The first castle built on the Raby estate, was constructed during the reign on King Cnut in the early 11th century. The castle stands now, was begun by John 3rd Baron Nevill in the 14th century. The Nevilles owned the castle until the Rising of the North in 1569. Then, the Nevilles lost the castle and a lot of their possessions. Raby Castle has been the home of Lord Banard's family since1626.

The exterior of the castle:
It is really beautiful, the towers are imposing and you can see the Kitchen Tower and Clifford's Tower with original windows.

The interior of the castle:
You can discover the outstanding castle: the Entrance Hall, the Barons'Hall, the Octagon Drawing Room, the Dining room created by William Burn in original design, the kitchen which was built in medieval style,the Blue Bedroom.

You can see also:

  • Paintings like many family portraits.
  • Crafts like porcelain, sculpture and armoury.
  • Furniture and decorative items.

The castle has a wonderful park and garden. In Raby Deer Park, there are the Red deer, Black, and White Fallow deer. And then,you can visit the garden with colourful flowers and special trees.

video
Well worth to visit.

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Birdoswald Roman Fort, Hadrian's Wall

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Today, I am posting information about Birdoswald Roman Fort on Hadrian's Wall. Birdoswald Roman Fort was one of the sixteen forts along Hadrian's Wall. It is a natural vantage point, which Roman planners utilised in their favour. The fort was occupied by Roman auxiliaries from 112AD to 400. It is one of the best preserved of the forts along Hadrian's Wall. Today, English Heritage assume the responsibility of the site.



video

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Highland Games in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Monday, July 27, 2009

Today, I am posting information about The Highland Games in Edinburgh on Saturday 25th and Sunday 26th. It was really amazing. The Highland Games are events held throughout in Scotland, once a years to celebrate Scottish and Celtic culture and heritage. During this event you have :
  • Highland Games combine athletic and sports competitions. This includes Caber tossing and hammer throwing.




  • Music: the pipe bands is one of the most memorable things during the Highland Games , the music of the bagpipe which is today the symbol of the games. Other musical instruments include the flute.

  • Dance: There are two basic forms of dancing at modern Highland Games gatherings, Scottish country dancing which is like ballroom dancing and Highland dancing which is referred to a style of athletic solo dancing.
  • Clan Village: You can find people who have the same name and keep in touch.


Then, you have a lot of activities for children and also you can discover the Scottish foods throughout the food stand.

The atmosphere was really fantastic,

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History, Whisky and Golf Tour Scotland.

Sunday, July 26, 2009

Today we commenced our tour in Fort William (rainy and overcast) then motored down through Glencoe (with brief stop at Visitor Centre) and on to Stirling Castle where the visit was hampered by torrential rain.

After Stirling we went up to Pitlochry to avail of a Distillery Tour at Edradour which lasted about one hour.


After a few selected purchases we moved on to St. Andrews where we spent time inspecting the famous Old Course and taking photos.


Then on to lodgings in Edinburgh.
A long but productive day.

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Scotland Highlands Tour

Saturday, July 25, 2009

Today, our small group commenced Fort William and then proceeded as follows:

-Inverlochy Castle, a magnificent ruin near to Fort William with free entry.



-A scenic view of Fort William from nearby Corpach.


-Glenfinnan, to visit the monument to Bonnie Prince Charlie and witness the famous Jacobite Express Steam Train chugging across the viaduct.


-Ferry from Mallaig to Armadale, Skye. A nice mini-cruise in glorious weather with added bonus of impromptu on board entertainment by a small group of young lady traditional Scottish music entertainers.

-Pub lunch at Eilean Iarmain, superb views at waters edge .Also art gallery and Gaelic Whisky shop.

-Visit artist gallery at Broadford, Skye.



-Across Skye Bridge to Eilean Donan Castle (photo opps) and then on up to Castle Urquhart on famous Loch Ness.



-Back to Fort William via Fort Augustus (pub meal) and then on down the Great Glen tracking various lochs in the clear late evening sunlight.



A great day! Watch this space for tomorrow's tour record.

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Lake District and Scotland Tour

Friday, July 24, 2009

Today, our tour group left Oughterside promptly about 9.00am and then visited

Carlisle for shopping and Internet access.

Next we drove to Birdoswald Roman Fort on Hadrian's Wall where we explored the fort remains and availed of photo opps.


Next was the long drive north to Scotland and a stop at the heritage village of Luss on Loch Lomond where, again, we availed of photo opps in the sunshine and visited the local church with its Viking era grave marker.


Next, we moved north, first tracking Loch Lomond then on into the Highlands via Rannoch Moor, Glencoe and Fort William where we are staying overnight.



Overall, a good day aided by clement weather.

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Day Tour England

Thursday, July 23, 2009

Today, we visited a variety of interesting sites including the ruins of Castle Barnard, the ruins of Egglestone Abbey ,Raby Castle, Ullswater (a lake) and Castlerigg Stone Circle. The stunning Lake District scenery added another dimension.














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Melrose Abbey, Scotland

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Today, our group commenced Edinburgh and travelled south through the Scottish borders. Here, we visited Melrose Abbey which dates from 1136. The Abbey has had a chequered history being battered by the English, rebuilt and then robbed of stone. Novelist Sir Walter Scott instigated repairs in the 19th century.


The Abbey is located in the pleasant country town of Melrose and is worth a visit if in the area. Robert the Bruce's heart was buried at the Abbey.

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Glasgow Cathedral, Glasgow, Scotland.

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Today, I am posting a short video on Glasgow Cathedral which is or also called St Mungo's Cathedral. It is the only Scottish medieval cathedral to have survived the Reformulation more or less intact, which was due to a division of the interior into three smaller churches. This cathedral was built during the 12th and the 13th centuries with the Sacristy and the Chapter House added in the early 14th century.
Today, the Cathedral is maintained by Historic Scotland. It is located close to the heart of city centre. Glasgow Cathedral is overlooked from the east by the Glasgow Necropolis whilst nearby is the St Mungo Museum built in 1993. It is a good tourist site. Expert Cathedral guides are available to groups visiting the Cathedral.

video

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Summer Colours at Greenbank Garden, Scotland

Monday, July 20, 2009

This afternoon, I visited nearby Greenbank Garden, south of Glasgow. This is something of a 'hidden gem' offering a combination of solitude and a variety of colours and plants in a walled garden dating back to the late 18th century. Colour contrast is the theme with hot bright reds and oranges compared with soft blues, creams and whites. Certain of the images capture bees at work.

The last of the still images shows the sculpture 'Foam' by Charles d'Orville Pilkington Jackson which dates from the 1938 Empire Exhibition.















video

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Hiking in Largs, Scotland.

Sunday, July 19, 2009

Today, we enjoyed a hike along the promenade in Largs. We were a little group of 8 persons. The hiking was good despite the weather which changed abruptly. You can see when we walked along the promenade, neighboring islands, ferries and sailboats.
This is the famous Waverley Paddle Steamer.

We stopped at the Pencil monument which commemorates the Battle of Largs from 1263.


After, we crossed Kelburn Country Centre, we had a fantastic view of the Island of Cumbrae and the Marina. At the end of the walk, the weather was better, we could enjoy the landscapes and the view.

It was a excellent hiking.

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Anonymous Alex Gallagher said...

Did I see a mention of your organisation in the weekend papers?

Glad you enjoyed your day hiking in Largs. Yesterday was indeed changeable, with a heavy shower every half-hour in the morning... and even some pm. But Largs is a nice place, even if the weather is a bit Scottish!

If you enjoyed the views there is another walk, through Douglas Park and up to the trig point, where the views are even better, IMO. It's quite steep towards the end, but not very strenous (there are steps some of the way). You could try that next time.

Or you could visit during our annual Viking Festival, http://www.largsvikingfestival.com/

July 20, 2009  

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Short Glasgow Tour Scotland

Saturday, July 18, 2009

Today, I collected a small group of visitors from the U.S. who are undertaking a Scotland-wide tour. The group were somewhat tired/jet lagged but we set off in good spirits and visited the following sites:

Bothwell Castle: This magnificent ruin has a history dating back to the 1270s under ownership of Walter of Moray who took inspiration from the great chateaux of Coucy in France. The castle was at the forefront on wars with England and it changed hands about five times and suffered considerable damage as a consequence. It was restored by 1381 but was abandoned by the 18th century and subsequently came into the care of Historic Scotland. The picturesque remains stand high above a bend in the River Clyde. One of the handful of castles in/near Glasgow and worth a visit.


video

Glasgow Cathedral
: This is Scotland's most important 13th century building which is located on a Christian site dating back to the 6th century. the present building was begun in the 13th century with the Sacristry and Chapter House added in the early 14th century. This is the only Scottish medieval cathedral to survive the Reformation more or less intact which was due to a division of the interior into three smaller churches. Our visit benefited from a private tour by an expert guide in the Cathedral. Click this link to view the video.



The Burrell Collection: This is a diverse collection of over 8000 art exhibits assembled by Sir William Burrell with proceeds from the sale of his merchant shipping fleet. This remarkable collection was donated to the city of Glasgow in 1944 and is housed within a purpose designed building in the ground's of Pollock Park.


The tour lasted about five hours in somewhat mixed weather conditions.

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Mackintosh-The Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow, Scotland.

Friday, July 17, 2009

Today, we continued the Charles Rennie Mackintosh theme by visiting the Willow Tea Rooms, located at 217 Sauchiehall St. in Glasgow, "Sauchiehall" means 'alley of the willows' and throughout the rooms Mackintosh used the willow motif.
Catherine Cranston more or less invented the Glasgow tea room phenomenon. She filled the need for a miniature social centre which served many purposes but principally as a safe meeting place.The Tea Rooms uniquely offered ladies rooms where respectable women could go out and meet, at a time when women without men in the urban scene were usually taken for servants or prostitutes. These were not cafes, but offered a range of privacies in the public world: rooms for lunch or private dining, rooms to read and write, to play billiards or smoke. They were almost clubs, without bedrooms and without alcohol.

For 21 years Mackintosh was Catherine Cranston's designer from 1897.

At Buchanan Street, he designed murals around George Walton furniture.

At Argyle Street, it was his loose furniture and light fittings within Walton's interior scheme.

At Imgram Street, he designed his first complete room, where from 1900, he remodeled interiors over 12 years.

Finally in 1903-1904 at Sauchiehall Street, he did the complete interiors and front facade of the building Miss Cranston bought in 1901. To Mackintosh the tea room offered the most completed public space of his career.

These Tea Rooms are well a worth a visit when in Glasgow, just a short walk from the City centre.

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House for an Art Lover, Glasgow, Scotland

Thursday, July 16, 2009


This morning we visited C.R.Mackintosh's celebrated House for an Art Lover at 10 Dumbreck Road.

Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868-1928) was a designer and artist whose wide-ranging skills encompassed the the design of complete buildings-their foundations and structural steel, their sophisticated ventilation systems and their plumbing. His key strength was the design of places to be inhabited, rooms and sequences of rooms, their form, light and material.


In 1901 Mackintosh entered a competition set by a German design magazine which sought entries to design a 'grand house in a thoroughly modern style.', and challenged architects to develop ideas which were fresh and innovative.



Mackintosh and wife Margaret McDonald worked on the submission which, unfortunately, was disqualified for non-compliance with the competition rules. However, the designs were awarded a special prize " for their pronounced personal quality, their novel and austere form and the uniform configuration of interior and exterior."


The house was never completed in Mackintosh's lifetime. Work commenced 1989 and finished 1996.


View the video for an appreciation of the house interior, exterior and nearby walled garden. Here is the link


For the artistically inclined visitor to Glasgow this is a "must". Entrance charge is modest, photographs are permitted and their is an excellent cafe and gift shop. Beware: first check opening hours as the House is used for corporate events and weddings. Visit in conjunction with the equally famous Burrell Collection which is located close by.







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Rosslyn Chapel, Scotland.

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Today, I posting information about Rosslyn Chapel. This now famous Chapel or "The Collegiate Chapel of St Matthew", was founded in 1446 by Sir William St Clair. At the death of Sir William in 1484, the Chapel was unfinished and the larger building he had planned was never realised. The building took more than forty years to finish.





The architecture is considered to be some of the finest in Scotland. The Chapel stands on fourteen pillars, which form an arcade of twelve pointed arches on three sides of the naves. At the east end, there are three pillars which are called: the Master Pillar, the Journeyman Pillar and the most famous, the Apprentice Pillar.




The Chapel is rich in carvings of the "green man". Over one hundred have been counted inside the building and one of the finest examples is the Lady Chapel ( is a English term for a chapel inside a cathedral or a church dedicated to the Virgin Mary).It stands between the altars to the Blessed Virgin and St. Andrews. There are many references to the Knights Templar and Freemasonry.
video

In 2004, the book by Dan Brown 'Da Vinci Code' was published which, together with the related film, increased the awareness of the Chapel, and triggered an unprecedented increase in visitor numbers. Rosslyn Chapel is now undergoing a major conservation project, with extensive renovations and also restrictions (you can not take pictures inside the Chapel). The Chapel retains an aura of mystery.
Well worth a visit if in the Edinburgh area.

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Dunfermline Abbey, Scotland

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

This evening, I am posting information on Dunfermline Abbey. The Abbey and surrounding ruins are all that remain of a Benedictine Abbey founded by Queen Margaret in the 11th century. The foundations of the original church are under the present nave built in the Romanesque style by David I. King Robert the Bruce is buried inside, his remains being found during building work in the 19th century.

Outside the east gable is located the Shrine of Queen Margaret, a place of pilgrimage since medieval times and nearby are the remains of the other monastic buildings, including the large refectory and the ruin of the Royal Palace.

Dunfermline means '"fortress by the crooked stream". It is conveniently located just north of Edinburgh and well placed for the Fife tourist route. However, from my experience, tour buses rarely visit so the Abbey and environs tend only to be patronised by private visitors which means that less hustle and bustle than nearby Edinburgh. With the right visibility, i.e.no rain, views are stunning and offer good photo opportunities. Nearby is the Andrew Carnegie Birthplace Museum.

To sum up, Dunfermline is sidelined from the main tourist trail but benefits from just that. There is a wealth of history and heritage here dating back almost one thousand years and to cap it the Abbey Church holds the remains of King Robert the Bruce, the victor at Bannockburn and who established a royal lineage from which the current British royal family can trace its provenance.

Not to be overlooked on a Scotland tour. You might even encounter the local peacock which acts as a modern-day guardian!










video

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Holmwood House, Glasgow, Scotland

Monday, July 13, 2009

This afternoon, I visited Alexander 'Greek' Thomson's Holmwood House which is located south of Glasgow centre near Cathcart.

This magnificent property dates from 1857-8 and was designed in the Greek style asymmetrically. In the video, note the wall which connects the main house with the coach house.

The property was built for the owner of a local paper mill with a dual function: (a) as a high status residence and (b) as a sales/entertainment venue to impress potential clients.

The property is now in custodianship of heritage organisation, the National Trust for Scotland and can be visited during prescribed opening hours.



video

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Southern Necropolis Glasgow Scotland

Sunday, July 12, 2009

This evening, I am posting a video clip of Glasgow's Southern Necropolis (City of the Dead).

This is a fascinating site containing the remains of 250,00 people. Due to vandalism there is an an 'eery' quality about the site, especially as dusk falls.

Although located in what is/was a deprived social area (the Gorbals), the burial ground does contain interesting grave stones from a wealthy class comprising merchants, traders, shipbuilders and architects from the time when Glasgow was known as the 'second city of the (British) empire'. There are also memorials to soldiers. ministers of religion, musicians, actors plus artisans and tradesmen.

I operate a separate Glasgow Ancestry blog which contains many records of the deceased from the Southern Necropolis. I am always surprised by the high level of mortality, particularly infant mortality during the 19th C Victorian era with families sometimes losing 4 or more young children.

Glasgow Council has, helpfully, devised a Heritage Trail through the Necropolis which visits the graves of some of the more celebrated deceased persons.




video

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Ceilidh at Glasgow, Scotland

Saturday, July 11, 2009

This evening I am posting a video from last evening's ceilidh in central Glasgow.

The name is a Gaelic word pronounced 'kaylee'.This type of event is popular in Scotland and Ireland and comprises an informal gathering with singing dancing and storytelling.


video

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Gorbals, Glasgow, Scotland.

Friday, July 10, 2009

Today, we visited the Gorbals, Glasgow, Scotland, it is a neighborhood which had a poor reputation.

The Gorbals has long had a reputation as a zone of violence and poverty. It was often referred to as the most dangerous place in UK with street gangs and casual violence. There was a history of health and social problems related to poor design and low-quality construction of housing.


During 20th. century efforts were made to clear the slum tenements by Glasgow Corporation and replace them with the new high-rise flats but this did little to improve it's reputation.


In recent years, some of high-rise buildings have been demolished and modern low-rise flats are being built. Glasgow City Council has established a plan to demolish yet more of high-rise blocks and to comprehensively refurbish others.

It is a new neighborhood refurbished but with traces of past reputation. video

Today, our visit benefited from bright sunshine.

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Visit Stirling Castle, Scotland.

Thursday, July 09, 2009

This evening, I am posting information and images on Stirling Castle, formerly home of the Stewart Court and one of Scotland's premier visitor attractions.
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It was said that "He who holds Stirling, holds Scotland" and many different people have held it in the last 900 years.

Stirling Castle was once home of the Stewart Kings and Queens of Scotland. Places to visit at the Castle include the Great Hall, the Chapel Royal, the impressive Outer Defences and the cannons on the Grand Battery. Discover how kings, armies and leaders defended their lives and their country in bygone days.
After the royal court departed, Stirling Castle become a military garrison and later an army depot and training facility.

Today you can visit the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders' Regimental Museum to explore more than two hundred years of regiment's history.

Another aspect of Stirling Castle is its proximity to two famous battle sites, namely Bannockburn (1314) and Stirling Bridge (1297). These were decisive battles in Scotland's fight for independence.

Apart from the history aspect, the castle is located on a high elevation and affords superb views across the surrounding countryside, especially when the sun is shining!

video

Well worth a visit.

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Inverness, Scotland.

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

Today, I am posting a video clip of central Inverness, a city which is styled as Capital of the(Scottish) Highlands. Inverness is one of the oldest and famous towns in Scotland, dating from about AD585 although few buildings of real age or hsitorical significance have survived. The impressive castle dates from 1834 and is used by the Local Authority.
Current population of the city is 44,000.
The word Inverness comes from the Gaelic meaning "Mouth of the River Ness". A walk around the riverside will afford beautiful mountain views and wildlife in the heart of the city. Inverness offers a peaceful and historic setting and possibly best suited as base for touring the local area which includes Loch Ness, Cawdor Castle, Culloden Battlefield, Brodie Castle, Fort George and much more.
Well worth a visit in context of a Highlands tour.


video

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Clava Cairns 'Balnuaran of Clava', Scotland.

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

This evening, I am posting a video clip of a famous, 4000 year old prehistoric site located near to Inverness in the Scottish Highlands and which comprises a group of prehistoric burial cairns:

>The North-East Cairn, which is a well preserved passage grave and was probably completely enclosed when built. This monument is aligned with the Midwinter Solstice.

>The Central Cairn, which is a ring cairn and consist of an unbroken circular enclosure which was open at the centre.

>The Kerb Cairn, which is a small ring of boulders located close to the central ring cairn. Note use of different coloured stones.

>The south-West Cairn, which is almost identical to the other passage grave and shares the same orientation on the midwinter sun.



video

This site is relatively close to the more famous Culloden Battlefield. Entrance is free.

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Private Scotland Tour

Monday, July 06, 2009

Today, we started from Inverness, Capital of the Highlands and headed for two nearby sites, namely Culloden Battlefield and Clava Cairns. Culloden is where occurred the last battle on British soil in 1746 where a British Government force under General Cumberland comprehensively and ruthlessly defeated a Jacobite/Highland army under the charismatic 'Bonnie Prince Charlie'. There is an excellent Visitor Centre at Culloden. See image no 4 below for 18th century armaments.

Next we visited the close by Clava Cairns which date back some 4000 years into prehistory.

The following two images are of Clava as is this video clip
After Clava we drove down to Pitlochry in Perthshire for a pub lunch. See image no. 3.
Unfortunately the Edradour Distillery was unexpectedly closed so we continues our journey down to Stirling Castle which mainly dates from the 16th century (images 5 and 6).



Overall a productive day albeit we suffered from very heavy rainfall.







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Small Group Scottish Highlands Tour.

Sunday, July 05, 2009

This morning, I collected a group of six visitors at Glasgow following which we visited:

  • Glasgow Cathedral.

  • Heritage village of Luss on Loch Lomond.




  • Glencoe.




  • Inverlochy Castle (near Fort William).

  • Castle Urquhart on Loch Ness.


We are staying overnight in Inverness, the self-styled capital of the Highlands. More come tomorrow.

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Orange Order March, Glasgow, Scotland July 4th

Saturday, July 04, 2009

This morning, I went into Glasgow to witness the 'Orangefest' which comprises a march through Glasgow (ending at Kelvingrove) by massed marching bands of the Orange Order in celebration of the victory by the Protestant King William III over the deposed (and Roman Catholic) King James II (England) who was also King James VII of Scotland. This battle took place at the River Boyne in Ireland and resulted in a victory by William over James who had armies comprising 35,000 and 21,ooo men respectively.

The Orange Order is a protestant dominated movement which was founded in Northern Ireland in 1795.

Despite the undertone of sectarianism the parade was carried out in a peaceful and ordered manner in bright sunshine. The colourful banners and uniformed marching bands added an extra dimension.

Below are a selection of still images plus a compilation video clip.
















For the video clip click here.

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Mons Meg Cannon at Edinburgh Castle Scotland

Friday, July 03, 2009

This evening, I am posting a video and comment on one of the most famous cannons in Scotland, 'Mons Meg'. This 6 ton monster, which dates dates from 1457, is located at Edinburgh Castle and proves very popular with the tourists as a backdrop for photo shoots.

The names 'Mons' reflects its origins at Mons in Belgium whilst 'Meg' is an abbreviation for Margaret.

The cannon was given to King James II (of Scotland) as a gift but its weight militated against practical use in mobile warfare and the artillery piece was retired in 1650.

One of the many interesting sites at Edinburgh Castle.

video

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View of Edinburgh, Scotland.

Thursday, July 02, 2009

Today, I am posting a video clip of Edinburgh, was taken from the vantage point of Edinburgh Castle and shows: The New Town (18th century) Firth of Forth ( Bay where River Forth enters the North Sea), Calton Hill ("Athens of the North"). It was a nice day and the weather was good.

For the video clip click here.

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Bearsden Roman Bath-House, Scotland.

Wednesday, July 01, 2009

Today, we visited The Antonine Wall and Bearsden Roman Bath-House, Scotland.
The Antonine Wall was the northernmost frontier of the Roman'occupation. Construction was begun in 138 AD, during the reign of Emperor Antonius Pius, and continued for four years. The Antonine Wall represents an incredible part of Scotland's history. In 2008, the Antonine Wall gave World Heritage Status, from the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, it recognised as one of the most important historical sites in the world.
video
After, we visited Bearsden Roman Bath-House. Bearsden Roman bath-house stood in a fortified annexe attached to Bearsden Roman fort. It was built in the years following 142 AD by the army of the Roman emperor Antonius Pius. The bath-house was used by the whole garrison and there had steam rooms, dry hot and cold rooms and hot and cold baths.
The bath-house was discovered in 1973 during excavations carried out in advance of the house construction.
video
The Antonine Wall and Bearsden Roman Bath-House are remarkable examples of the survival of ancient archaeological remains. Well worth a visit.

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